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Saturday, September 13, 2014

Acesulfame Potassium (Acesulfame K) in Food and Beverage and Healt Effect Warning

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OTHERS HOT INFO:
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Acesulfame potassium is a calorie-free sweetener that has been used in foods and beverages around the world for 15 years. The ingredient, which is 200 times sweeter than sugar, has been used in numerous foods in the United States since 1988. In the U.S., it is used in such products as candies, baked goods, frozen desserts, beverages, dessert mixes and tabletop sweeteners. Acesulfame potassium, which is also known as acesulfame K, is often used in combination with other low-calorie sweeteners because it enhances the sweet taste of foods and beverages.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other leading health organizations have found the ingredient to be safe for all segments of the population. More than 90 studies have demonstrated the safety of acesulfame potassium. The ingredient is currently used in more than 4,000 foods and beverages in about 90 countries around the world.

What is acesulfame potassium?

Acesulfame potassium is a calorie-free sweetener that is 200 times sweeter than sugar. The sweetener is used in a wide variety of foods in the United States.

Why is acesulfame potassium used?

Acesulfame potassium offers consumers a greater choice of low-calorie or reduced-sugar foods that can help them manage their calorie intake. Acesulfame potassium can be used in baking because it is stable, retaining its sweetness at normal baking temperatures. The sweetener, which can be used alone, often is blended with other low-calorie sweeteners to produce a more sugar-like taste than that of any of the low-calorie sweeteners alone.

What kinds of food products contain acesulfame potassium?

Acesulfame potassium is currently used in more than 4,000 products around the world. In the United States, acesulfame potassium is approved for use in candies, tabletop sweeteners, chewing gums, beverages, dessert and dairy product mixes, baked goods, alcoholic beverages, syrups, refrigerated and frozen desserts, and sweet sauces and toppings.

Healt Effect Warning Info..!!

Acesulfame Potassium was approved for use by the FDA as a safe artificial sweetener. Unfortunately, several potential problems associated with the use of acesulfame have been raised. They are based largely on animal studies since testing on humans remains limited. The findings showed the following:

Acesulfame K stimulates insulin secretion in a dose dependent fashion thereby possibly aggravating reactive hypoglycemia ("low blood sugar attacks")

Acesulfame K apparently produced lung tumors, breast tumors, rare types of tumors of other organs (such as the thymus gland), several forms of leukemia and chronic respiratory disease in several rodent studies, even when less than maximum doses were given. According to the Center for Science in the Public Interest, it was petitioned on August 29, l988 for a stay of approval by the FDA because of "significant doubt" about its safety. Read detail at Dr. H.J. Roberts, Aspartame (NutraSweet) Is It Safe?, Charles Press, page 283/84.

Info from naturalnews.com

Acesulfame-K: Acesulfame-K (aka "Ace-K") is a potassium salt containing methylene chloride, a known carcinogen. Acesulfame-K is not the same thing as Aspartame, but quite often, BOTH are found in the same products. Reported side effects of "sweet devil" Acesulfame-K are frightening: "Long term exposure to methylene chloride can cause nausea, headaches, mood problems, impairment of the liver and kidneys, problems with eyesight and possibly cancer. Acesulfame-K may contribute to hypoglycemia." (http://www.fitday.com)

Also, of all the artificial sweeteners out there, Acesulfame-K has undergone the least scientific scrutiny. Early studies showed a link to multiple cancer developments in lab animals. If you have any doubts whatsoever, remember this; humans have 99% the same DNA as the lab mice and rats tested. The "proof is in the pudding!" The research is concrete on this and ignorance is NOT bliss! (http://archives.cnn.com)

Detail info about Acesulfame Potassium from FAO

SYNONYMS: Acesulfame K; INS No. 950

Chemical names:
Potassium salt of 6-methyl-1,2,3-oxathiazine-4(3H)-one-2,2-dioxide; potassium salt of 3,4-dihydro-6-methyl-1,2,3-oxathiazine-4-one-2,2-dioxide

Chemical formula: C4H4KNO4S

Method of Assay

Precipitation test:
Add a few drops of a 10% solution of sodium cobaltinitrite to a solution of 0.2 g of the sample in 2 ml of acetic acid TS and 2 ml of water. A yellow precipitate is produced.

Titration test:
Dissolve about 0.15 g of the dried sample (dissolution may be slow), accurately weighed, in 50.0 ml glacial acetic acid and titrate potentiometrically with 0.1 N perchloric acid, or add two drops of crystal violet TS and titrate with 0.1 N perchloric acid, to a blue-green end-point which persists for at least 30 sec. Perform a blank determination and make any necessary correction. Each ml of 0.1 N perchloric acid is equivalent to 20.12 mg of C4H4KNO4S.

This page concern to food sciences, nutrition and additives topics. The information provides thorough and up-to-date information, covering a broad range of topics in the food science and technology. Topics covered include: Food industry, food groups and composition, food chemistry, food processing and preservation, food laws and regulations, food microbiology and fermentation, food safety, food toxicology, food biotechnology, sensory evaluation, and food product development.

OTHERS INFO: A lot of information about Easy Test Kit Product can you read detail at Easy Test Kit Website and a lot of information on the use of formalin (formaldehyde) in food or beverages in Indonesia (including some other hazardous materials) can read details on THIS BLOG.

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